Archives de Tag: musique

ESP – Los viejos « grupis » de Elliott Murphy

Nunca había escuchado hablar de él. Cuando lo vi caminando entre la gente en el auditorio del Collège Franco-Britannique ese domingo en la tarde, con su sombrero moteado de piel de guepardo, si los guepardos fueran blancos, y su pelo blanco y liso que le caía a los dos lados de la cara, y su chaleco, y su pinta de mago, si los magos dejaran de utilizar su copa negra y alta y ridícula, pensé que era uno de esos personajes de la Cité que todos hemos visto alguna vez y que muchos vemos casi todos los días, como fantasmas en los lugares que, tal vez y sólo tal vez, habitaron antes y de los cuales no han podido despegarse nunca. Alguno que, por casualidad, yo no conociera. Ya adentro, cuando vi de reojo los discos en la entrada, con la fotografía de su cara, y mientras buscaba a Jeanne, mi novia, que me guardaba un puesto en la tercera fila, me di cuenta de que “él” era Elliott Murphy. Lire la suite

1 commentaire

Classé dans Espagnol

ANG – A new Persian Revolution?

When aspiring musician Ramin Sadighi was growing up during the Iran-Iraq war, the Iranian music scene was on hold. Rock and pop were banned, and he could only play indoor gigs with his contemporary
jazz band. These days, the 42-year-old’s record label, Hermes,
is a major axis of the burgeoning
experimental Iranian music movement. Now entering its ninth year, its trademark electro-instrumental
and experimental classical sounds have already earned it recognition
on the world music scene:
a Grammy nomination for its “East meets East” album ‘Endless Vision’, and the Iranian Label of the Year award at the 2006 Fajr International Music Festival.
I find the Hermes headquarters
tucked away in an unmarked apartment behind the chaotic Shariati
Avenue, North Tehran. Ramin welcomes me with a wide grin and ushers me into his office, a converted
living room. His beard and long hair are a signature Tehrani intellectual look. “I am a musician myself, so I’m not the standard big fat producer, the bad guy. I’m coming
from the same side,” he says knowingly in perfect English.
Ramin is also an astute businessman,
and clearly a pioneer by nature.
The contra bass player, who was born into a musical family, studied industrial engineering at university, and is by profession a business consultant. He reels off an impressive list of entrepreneurial
ventures: he established the first Iranian internet provider, ‘Neda Rayneh’, in 1991; and while a consultant to music and book chain ‘Book City,’ was the first to begin importing foreign music after the Revolution. “There was nothing written in law, but no one was daring to jump into that business.
I had to get permission from the Ministry of Culture. It took 6 or 7 months of arguments. They formed the council because of my requests.”
His efforts proved to be a success, so much so that his employers even provided
him with an interest-free loan and distribution agreement to start Hermes in parallel. “I realised there
were some layers missing in the music industry.” Once again Ramin was looking to break new ground, creating a “laboratory for experimenting on Persian music.” “There’s an abstract vision or idea, and you just want to explore.
That’s why half of these CDs are failed experiments,” he says, gesturing to a neat row of shelved CDs on my right.
The turning point came with the crossover electro-instrumental album
‘Journey’ written and performed
by Setar player (4-string lute) Masoud Shaari and electronically fused by Christophe Rezai. “From that point people believed there is something happening here.” And the experiments became more ambitious.
Ramin mentions Afgah, whose album ‘Genesis’ mounts an abstract orchestration of between five and eighteen Tombaks. I ask whether his experimental approach
has encountered any internal
resistance. Only from a hardcore of the traditional music system (Radif), who believe Hermes
is “ruining Persian music”.
But Ramin’s contempt for convention
is innate, and extends even to his business model. “I’m investing in a concept. I don’t own any of my artists: it’s just an open friendship. We work together as long as we have common wavelengths. Each album is a sort of small company where Hermes and the artists have shares.”
Such dedication to the Hermes vision has earned him his own “family” of talented artists and a large fan base. “It is the only label in Iran to become a brand. This is the only thing I am proud of,” he boasts. And despite operating
in an environment void of copyright
law, where getting permission
to hold a concert is difficult, he finally made a profit for the first time this year.
Ramin believes Iranian music could flourish on the world stage, in the same way Indian music did in the sixties and seventies, if only his colleagues would refrain from flouting copyright law. “But I am not the Minister of Culture,” he says jokingly, “I’m just running a business here.” But we both know it’s much more than that.
Lucinda Homa Dunn
Malgré un contrôle gouvernemental souvent très strict, notamment sur la musique, la culture perse n’en est pas moins extrêmement dynamique. En témoigne l’apparition du label de musique expérimentale Hermes, aujourd’hui reconnu internationalement, et qui fut le premier après la Révolution à pouvoir offrir un espace d’expression aux musiciens iraniens. CB est allé rencontrer Ramin Sadighi à Téhéran et vous rapporte ici un entretien qui a force de symbole.
8
http://www.aircup.orgMalgré un contrôle gouvernemental souvent très strict, notamment sur la musique, la culture perse n’en est pas moins extrêmement dynamique. En témoigne l’apparition du label de musique expérimentale Hermes, aujourd’hui reconnu internationalement, et qui fut le premier après la Révolution à pouvoir offrir un espace d’expression aux musiciens iraniens. CB est allé rencontrer Ramin Sadighi à Téhéran et vous rapporte ici un entretien qui a force de symbole.

Malgré un contrôle gouvernemental souvent très strict, notamment sur la musique, la culture perse n’en est pas moins extrêmement dynamique. En témoigne l’apparition du label de musique expérimentale Hermes, aujourd’hui reconnu internationalement, et qui fut le premier après la Révolution à pouvoir offrir un espace d’expression aux musiciens iraniens. CB est allé rencontrer Ramin Sadighi à Téhéran et vous rapporte ici un entretien qui a force de symbole.

When aspiring musician Ramin Sadighi was growing up during the Iran-Iraq war, the Iranian music scene was on hold. Rock and pop were banned, and he could only play indoor gigs with his contemporary jazz band. These days, the 42-year-old’s record label, Hermes, is a major axis of the burgeoning experimental Iranian music movement. Now entering its ninth year, its trademark electro-instrumental and experimental classical sounds have already earned it recognition on the world music scene: a Grammy nomination for its “East meets East” album ‘Endless Vision’, and the Iranian Label of the Year award at the 2006 Fajr International Music Festival.

I find the Hermes headquarters tucked away in an unmarked apartment behind the chaotic Shariati Avenue, North Tehran. Ramin welcomes me with a wide grin and ushers me into his office, a converted living room. His beard and long hair are a signature Tehrani intellectual look. “I am a musician myself, so I’m not the standard big fat producer, the bad guy. I’m coming from the same side,” he says knowingly in perfect English. Ramin is also an astute businessman, and clearly a pioneer by nature.

The contra bass player, who was born into a musical family, studied industrial engineering at university, and is by profession a business consultant. He reels off an impressive list of entrepreneurial ventures: he established the first Iranian internet provider, ‘Neda Rayneh’, in 1991; and while a consultant to music and book chain ‘Book City,’ was the first to begin importing foreign music after the Revolution. “There was nothing written in law, but no one was daring to jump into that business. I had to get permission from the Ministry of Culture. It took 6 or 7 months of arguments. They formed the council because of my requests.”

His efforts proved to be a success, so much so that his employers even provided him with an interest-free loan and distribution agreement to start Hermes in parallel. “I realised there were some layers missing in the music industry.” Once again Ramin was looking to break new ground, creating a “laboratory for experimenting on Persian music.” “There’s an abstract vision or idea, and you just want to explore. That’s why half of these CDs are failed experiments,” he says, gesturing to a neat row of shelved CDs on my right.

The turning point came with the crossover electro-instrumental album ‘Journey’ written and performed by Setar player (4-string lute) Masoud Shaari and electronically fused by Christophe Rezai. “From that point people believed there is something happening here.” And the experiments became more ambitious.

Ramin mentions Afgah, whose album ‘Genesis’ mounts an abstract orchestration of between five and eighteen Tombaks. I ask whether his experimental approach has encountered any internal resistance. Only from a hardcore of the traditional music system (Radif), who believe Hermes is “ruining Persian music”.

But Ramin’s contempt for convention is innate, and extends even to his business model. “I’m investing in a concept. I don’t own any of my artists: it’s just an open friendship. We work together as long as we have common wavelengths. Each album is a sort of small company where Hermes and the artists have shares.”

Such dedication to the Hermes vision has earned him his own “family” of talented artists and a large fan base. “It is the only label in Iran to become a brand. This is the only thing I am proud of,” he boasts. And despite operating in an environment void of copyright law, where getting permission to hold a concert is difficult, he finally made a profit for the first time this year.

Ramin believes Iranian music could flourish on the world stage, in the same way Indian music did in the sixties and seventies, if only his colleagues would refrain from flouting copyright law. “But I am not the Minister of Culture,” he says jokingly, “I’m just running a business here.” But we both know it’s much more than that.

Lucinda Homa Dunn

www.hermesrecords.com

The Independent, 4 May 2007 Meet the Persian music-makers

Du même auteur :

Media Training, Afghan agenda: (3 août 2009)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/aug/03/media-industry-news

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Anglais

ESP: Pop a la contra: Vetusta Morla.

Pop a la contra: Vetusta Morla.

_o5p20272

Empecemos por el principio. Tras el nombre de Vetusta (extremadamente viejo, anticuado) y Morla (tortuga gigante de « La Historia Interminable », de Michael Ende) se esconde un grupo que ha supuesto todo un choque de aire fresco para el pop español, anquilosado por muchos de sus grupos en las viejas normas de los noventa. Primer disco de estudio y explosión sónica, « Un día en el Mundo ». Afortunadamente, y no sin cierta dosis de ironía, estos madrileños conjugan la delicadeza del pop con las letras profundas e intrincadas de un simbolismo urbano preocupado tanto por la soledad y la hipocresía que por los amores frustrados. El pop sale de la cueva de los quejicas y plantea verdaderas dudas con mayúsculas. Tantas como dudas que les ha dado tiempo a acumular en sus experiencias personales de diez años de carrera, rasgando la carretera desde Tres Cantos (en Madrid) a Beirut, por ejemplo. Presentan con una variedad caleidoscópica de temas, en un disco sólido y maduro, lo que les ha valido los mejores halagos de la prensa musical española y ser nombrado mejor disco, por ejemplo, por Radio 3 (cadena de radio pública, puntal de la música no comercial en España). Gestado en dos años y autoproducido por ellos, después de varios EP’s y decenas de canciones que sólo se han oído de momento en concierto, este « Día en el Mundo » contiene enormes temas merecedores de escucha en bucle, como « Copenhage », « La Marea » o « Pequeño Desastre Animal ». Dicen ellos mismos que ha sido un trabajo muy arduo el transmitir la fuerza con la que pegan en directo (lo que se ve en sus EP’s). Los periodistas no se cansan de preguntarles si tardarán otros diez años en publicar su siguiente álbum, una cuestión que esconde un ansia de la prensa por escuchar más de ellos. Disco entonces muy recomendable con el que no reventarán las listas de ventas, pero con el que desde luego ha abierto una brecha en el pop español. Sentado este precedente, veremos que puede llegar a surgir. De momento otro proyecto de su misma cuerda llamado De Pedro; atentos a Cité Babel. Escucha a Vetusta Morla en http://www.vetustamorla.com OV Entrevista a vetusta morla en « Cervantes TV »: http://www.cervantestv.es/musica_danza/video_entrevista_vetusta_morla.htm

Une révolution dans la pop espagnole: Vetusta Morla

_o5p1555

Commençons par le concept de Vetusta Morla. Derrière le nom Vetusta (de vétuste: extrêmement vieux, désuet) et de Morla (inspiré de la tortue géante de « l’Histoire Interminable », de Michael Ende), se dissimule un groupe qui a apporté une grande bouffée d’air frais à la pop espagnole, ankylosée par un nombre important de groupes engoncés dans les anciennes normes des années 1990. Leur premier album expérimental, « d’explosion sonique », Un día en el Mundo (Un jour dans le Monde) diffère totalement de ce que l’on avait pu entendre auparavant. Non sans une certaine dose d’ironie, ces madrilènes conjuguent la délicatesse de la pop avec des paroles profondes et complexes d’un symbolisme urbain préoccupé tant par la solitude et l’hypocrisie que par les amours frustrés. La pop sort enfin d’un long tunnel de médiocrité et pose de véritables questions avec des majuscules. Tant de questions soulevées lors de cette dizaine d’années de carrière à accumuler des expériences sur la route, sur la tournée de Madrid (Tres Cantos) à Beyrouth, par exemple. Ils abordent une variété kaléidoscopique de sujets, dans un disque solide et mûr, ce qui leur a valu les meilleures critiques de la presse musicale espagnole et d’être nommé meilleur disque par Radio 3 (chaîne de radio publique, pilier de la musique non commerciale en Espagne). Composé sur deux années et auto-produit, après plusieurs single et des dizaines de chansons qui ont été seulement entendues en concert, ce « Un día en el Mundo » contient des morceaux qui méritent d’être écoutés en boucle, comme « Copenhage », « La Marea » ou « Pequeño Desastre Animal». De leur propre aveu, il a été très difficile de retransmettre sur l’album la force qu’ils dégagent en live. Les journalistes ne se sont pas fatigués à leur demander si Vetusta Morla sortira un autre album d’ici dix autres années, une question qui révèle, peut-être, une certaine anxiété des médias de précisément ne plus les entendre Disque à recommander, il ne fera peut-être pas éclater les listes de ventes, mais il a ouvert une brèche dans la pop espagnole. Nous verrons si celle-ci est le début d’une nouvelle vague. Pour l’instant il existe un autre projet dans la même veine: De Pedro ; à suivre par Oscar dans Cité Babel. Écoutez Morla Vétuste sur http://www.vetustamorla.com

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Espagnol, Français