Archives de Tag: Iran

ANG – A new Persian Revolution?

When aspiring musician Ramin Sadighi was growing up during the Iran-Iraq war, the Iranian music scene was on hold. Rock and pop were banned, and he could only play indoor gigs with his contemporary
jazz band. These days, the 42-year-old’s record label, Hermes,
is a major axis of the burgeoning
experimental Iranian music movement. Now entering its ninth year, its trademark electro-instrumental
and experimental classical sounds have already earned it recognition
on the world music scene:
a Grammy nomination for its “East meets East” album ‘Endless Vision’, and the Iranian Label of the Year award at the 2006 Fajr International Music Festival.
I find the Hermes headquarters
tucked away in an unmarked apartment behind the chaotic Shariati
Avenue, North Tehran. Ramin welcomes me with a wide grin and ushers me into his office, a converted
living room. His beard and long hair are a signature Tehrani intellectual look. “I am a musician myself, so I’m not the standard big fat producer, the bad guy. I’m coming
from the same side,” he says knowingly in perfect English.
Ramin is also an astute businessman,
and clearly a pioneer by nature.
The contra bass player, who was born into a musical family, studied industrial engineering at university, and is by profession a business consultant. He reels off an impressive list of entrepreneurial
ventures: he established the first Iranian internet provider, ‘Neda Rayneh’, in 1991; and while a consultant to music and book chain ‘Book City,’ was the first to begin importing foreign music after the Revolution. “There was nothing written in law, but no one was daring to jump into that business.
I had to get permission from the Ministry of Culture. It took 6 or 7 months of arguments. They formed the council because of my requests.”
His efforts proved to be a success, so much so that his employers even provided
him with an interest-free loan and distribution agreement to start Hermes in parallel. “I realised there
were some layers missing in the music industry.” Once again Ramin was looking to break new ground, creating a “laboratory for experimenting on Persian music.” “There’s an abstract vision or idea, and you just want to explore.
That’s why half of these CDs are failed experiments,” he says, gesturing to a neat row of shelved CDs on my right.
The turning point came with the crossover electro-instrumental album
‘Journey’ written and performed
by Setar player (4-string lute) Masoud Shaari and electronically fused by Christophe Rezai. “From that point people believed there is something happening here.” And the experiments became more ambitious.
Ramin mentions Afgah, whose album ‘Genesis’ mounts an abstract orchestration of between five and eighteen Tombaks. I ask whether his experimental approach
has encountered any internal
resistance. Only from a hardcore of the traditional music system (Radif), who believe Hermes
is “ruining Persian music”.
But Ramin’s contempt for convention
is innate, and extends even to his business model. “I’m investing in a concept. I don’t own any of my artists: it’s just an open friendship. We work together as long as we have common wavelengths. Each album is a sort of small company where Hermes and the artists have shares.”
Such dedication to the Hermes vision has earned him his own “family” of talented artists and a large fan base. “It is the only label in Iran to become a brand. This is the only thing I am proud of,” he boasts. And despite operating
in an environment void of copyright
law, where getting permission
to hold a concert is difficult, he finally made a profit for the first time this year.
Ramin believes Iranian music could flourish on the world stage, in the same way Indian music did in the sixties and seventies, if only his colleagues would refrain from flouting copyright law. “But I am not the Minister of Culture,” he says jokingly, “I’m just running a business here.” But we both know it’s much more than that.
Lucinda Homa Dunn
Malgré un contrôle gouvernemental souvent très strict, notamment sur la musique, la culture perse n’en est pas moins extrêmement dynamique. En témoigne l’apparition du label de musique expérimentale Hermes, aujourd’hui reconnu internationalement, et qui fut le premier après la Révolution à pouvoir offrir un espace d’expression aux musiciens iraniens. CB est allé rencontrer Ramin Sadighi à Téhéran et vous rapporte ici un entretien qui a force de symbole.
8
http://www.aircup.orgMalgré un contrôle gouvernemental souvent très strict, notamment sur la musique, la culture perse n’en est pas moins extrêmement dynamique. En témoigne l’apparition du label de musique expérimentale Hermes, aujourd’hui reconnu internationalement, et qui fut le premier après la Révolution à pouvoir offrir un espace d’expression aux musiciens iraniens. CB est allé rencontrer Ramin Sadighi à Téhéran et vous rapporte ici un entretien qui a force de symbole.

Malgré un contrôle gouvernemental souvent très strict, notamment sur la musique, la culture perse n’en est pas moins extrêmement dynamique. En témoigne l’apparition du label de musique expérimentale Hermes, aujourd’hui reconnu internationalement, et qui fut le premier après la Révolution à pouvoir offrir un espace d’expression aux musiciens iraniens. CB est allé rencontrer Ramin Sadighi à Téhéran et vous rapporte ici un entretien qui a force de symbole.

When aspiring musician Ramin Sadighi was growing up during the Iran-Iraq war, the Iranian music scene was on hold. Rock and pop were banned, and he could only play indoor gigs with his contemporary jazz band. These days, the 42-year-old’s record label, Hermes, is a major axis of the burgeoning experimental Iranian music movement. Now entering its ninth year, its trademark electro-instrumental and experimental classical sounds have already earned it recognition on the world music scene: a Grammy nomination for its “East meets East” album ‘Endless Vision’, and the Iranian Label of the Year award at the 2006 Fajr International Music Festival.

I find the Hermes headquarters tucked away in an unmarked apartment behind the chaotic Shariati Avenue, North Tehran. Ramin welcomes me with a wide grin and ushers me into his office, a converted living room. His beard and long hair are a signature Tehrani intellectual look. “I am a musician myself, so I’m not the standard big fat producer, the bad guy. I’m coming from the same side,” he says knowingly in perfect English. Ramin is also an astute businessman, and clearly a pioneer by nature.

The contra bass player, who was born into a musical family, studied industrial engineering at university, and is by profession a business consultant. He reels off an impressive list of entrepreneurial ventures: he established the first Iranian internet provider, ‘Neda Rayneh’, in 1991; and while a consultant to music and book chain ‘Book City,’ was the first to begin importing foreign music after the Revolution. “There was nothing written in law, but no one was daring to jump into that business. I had to get permission from the Ministry of Culture. It took 6 or 7 months of arguments. They formed the council because of my requests.”

His efforts proved to be a success, so much so that his employers even provided him with an interest-free loan and distribution agreement to start Hermes in parallel. “I realised there were some layers missing in the music industry.” Once again Ramin was looking to break new ground, creating a “laboratory for experimenting on Persian music.” “There’s an abstract vision or idea, and you just want to explore. That’s why half of these CDs are failed experiments,” he says, gesturing to a neat row of shelved CDs on my right.

The turning point came with the crossover electro-instrumental album ‘Journey’ written and performed by Setar player (4-string lute) Masoud Shaari and electronically fused by Christophe Rezai. “From that point people believed there is something happening here.” And the experiments became more ambitious.

Ramin mentions Afgah, whose album ‘Genesis’ mounts an abstract orchestration of between five and eighteen Tombaks. I ask whether his experimental approach has encountered any internal resistance. Only from a hardcore of the traditional music system (Radif), who believe Hermes is “ruining Persian music”.

But Ramin’s contempt for convention is innate, and extends even to his business model. “I’m investing in a concept. I don’t own any of my artists: it’s just an open friendship. We work together as long as we have common wavelengths. Each album is a sort of small company where Hermes and the artists have shares.”

Such dedication to the Hermes vision has earned him his own “family” of talented artists and a large fan base. “It is the only label in Iran to become a brand. This is the only thing I am proud of,” he boasts. And despite operating in an environment void of copyright law, where getting permission to hold a concert is difficult, he finally made a profit for the first time this year.

Ramin believes Iranian music could flourish on the world stage, in the same way Indian music did in the sixties and seventies, if only his colleagues would refrain from flouting copyright law. “But I am not the Minister of Culture,” he says jokingly, “I’m just running a business here.” But we both know it’s much more than that.

Lucinda Homa Dunn

www.hermesrecords.com

The Independent, 4 May 2007 Meet the Persian music-makers

Du même auteur :

Media Training, Afghan agenda: (3 août 2009)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/aug/03/media-industry-news

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